Trip, Slip and Fall Hazard: Hidden Depressions in Grade

Successful landscapes require:

  • Proper grading, drainage and amended soil.
  • An automatic irrigation system achieving 100% head to head coverage.
  • Properly installed, high quality plant material.

Each of these functions may require a specific type component, installed at a specific height or location to reduce the potential of creating a site hazard that may result in an accident.  In commercial applications, landscape plans usually include details and specifications dictating type of product and how it should be installed.

Many common landscape products may be improperly installed including:

  • Pop up heads may be incorrectly set to grade against a sidewalk.
  • Valve or drainage boxes set too high or low relative to finish grade.
  • Shrub head installed on a riser adjacent to concrete improvement.
  • Hidden, obscured depressions in grade due to substandard compaction, settlement and subsidence.

    Drainage box set too low.

Improper product selection or substandard installation practices may appear obvious.  A pop up sprinkler head set above the top of  adjacent concrete sidewalk creates a trip hazard.  A drainage structure set well below the turf grade creates a trip slip and fall hazard.  Selecting and installing a spray head on a rigid riser next to a pedestrian sidewalk is a sub-standard industry practice that creates a trip and fall hazard.

Spray head on a riser next to a sidewalk creates a trip hazard.

Not all landscape hazards are visible.  Turf areas may have grade depressions or holes that are hidden by overgrown turf grass.  Depending on the cause and time period, turf grass may completely hide the depth, location and size of the depression or hole, creating a hidden hazard.

A depression, rut or hole may result from several factors.  Repeated mowing on saturated turf may  create ruts.  Overwatering may cause irrigation or utility trench settlement.  A dead tree removed from a turf area may result in a future depression if the grade is not properly backfilled and compacted.

A seven inch deep hole hidden by turf grass.

Bermuda grass is a fast horizontal spreading turf-grass used in parks and recreation facilities throughout the country.  Unless regularly aerated and de-thatched, Bermuda grass in known to grow a  thick layer of thatch.  Over time, the thatch layer can increase the turf grade several inches above adjacent sidewalk and curbs.

The backfill in utility trenches installed across pre-existing turf may settle, creating a depression in the sub-grade.  The photo depicts the edge of a trench cut across an asphalt driveway, across a turf area.  The trench backfill eventually settled, creating a trench sub-grade depression hidden by the Bermuda grass.

Thatch, hidden depression and sanded turf.

The depression resulted in a trip and fall accident.  After the accident, several hidden turf depressions were “sanded” to fill  depressions to proper grade.

Not all landscape hazards are open and obvious.  Even a perfectly installed landscape may develop hazardous conditions if not regularly inspected and maintained.

Irrigation systems should be monitored, inspected, tested and adjusted monthly.  Turf should be trimmed around utility boxes and vaults regularly, aerated and de-thatched annually to maintain optimum performance and minimize grade changes.  Drainage structures should be grade adjusted, repaired or replaced when damaged.  Valve, electrical and junction boxes should be monitored for grade changes and adjusted as required.  Bark mulch thickness should be monitored and supplemented annually to maintain proper coverage and grade.

In summary, a properly installed landscape is composed of several systems and components that require regular ongoing maintenance for optimum performance, efficiency and safety.  Pro-active landscape maintenance may reduce potential hazards, resultant accidents and lawsuits.  These actions demonstrates an Owner’s recognition of protecting the health and safety of the public, pedestrians, friends and family who may visit and use the site and may prove useful in a legal action.

A Horticulturists Local Neighborhood Walk

I took my usual walk through local neighborhoods surrounding Balboa Park in San Diego.  A glorious spring day, I couldn’t help but marvel at the beautiful ornamental landscape trees, shrubs and vines in bloom everywhere!  Very uplifting, glad plants are not affected by the virus!

Arborist Online Learning Opportunities in the Covid Era

In a recent blog, I discussed using online media for a site online site inspection involving a Torrey pine tree root conflict with adjacent asphalt paving.  That marked the first time I used an online media tool rather than being physically present at the site.  My client and I used Facetime to conduct the real time inspection.

As the restrictions ease, I believe the use of online media such as Zoom, Hangouts, Facetime etc will increase.  I have already presented this concept to a legal client in Northern California concerning an irrigation inspection.  Do I really need to fly from San Diego to San Francisco, rent a car, drive to the site, observe irrigation defects, then reverse the process returning home or, can I watch the inspection over the web?  The level of scrutiny required depends on the individual case.

A slide from Dr. Smiley’s presentation

Like so many other industries, the tree industry is rapidly adapting to the new Covid – 19 reality.  Today, I attended an online Zoom seminar titled Sidewalks, Urban Plazas and Tree Roots.  This seminar was presented through the ISA Southern Extension.  I believe it was originally going to be part of a “normal” ISA Southern Association Annual meeting that was cancelled due to Covid.

The online presentation occurred through Zoom with over 1000 arborists throughout the U.S. and other countries attending. The topic concerned tree roots damaging sidewalks, presented by Dr. Thomas Smiley.  Once a few technical glitches were adjusted, the presentation was almost identical to what I had experienced attending many seminars.

The slides presented alongside the audio streaming from Dr. Smiley was easy to view.  I became immersed in the content and found myself taking pics of some of the slides.  The topic provided test data results using different techniques designed to reduce root intrusion beneath sidewalks.

Incorporating root growth inhibitor practices

 

The presentation lasted an hour, same amount of time I’m accustomed to when attending a seminar.  Although I already knew a great deal about the topic, I still came away with new information for use in my practice, including a great specification detail incorporating multiple root growth inhibitor practices that may reduce sidewalk damage due to roots.

In the past month, I’ve been able to continue my consulting practice from my home office.  I’ll continue to utilize more online media tools, whether for learning, conducting site inspection work, and client meetings.  I believe these new opportunities are one of the (few) beneficial results from the Covid-19 virus.

I recently provided a client with a proposal to develop landscape maintenance specifications for commercial properties located in several different climatic regions.  The proposal did not include any site visits.  All data collection would occur online through various means.  Using online data collection versus conducting multiple site visits saved the client thousands of dollars.

I’m looking forward to these new opportunities utilizing online media sources as potential replacement for physical presence.  Hopefully it will prove an efficient, effective, cost saving technique without sacrificing product accuracy.

 

 

 

Online Site Inspections with Corona Virus: A New Paradigm?

The corona virus and resulting stay at home order has prevented me from scheduling or attending site inspections.  I require site inspection for most forms of consulting work, including as a consulting arborist or expert witness.

  • Tree failures, health and risk assessment
  • Tree inventories
  • Tree and nursery appraisals
  • Tree roots and infrastructure damage.
  • Landscape appurtenances creating trip and fall hazard.
  • Obscured landscape hazards, grade changes
  • Irrigation operation, maintenance issues

A client wanted me to attend and observe asphalt paving taking place adjacent to an 80 year old Torrey Pine.  I had previously consulted on preserving this tree during construction on an adjacent property.  The client was repaving his driveway on the alley, the pine is right on the edge of the paving.

Due to California stay at home orders, I informed the client I could not be present to observe the paving to make recommendations, so we used the Facetime app and did an online site observation whereby I watched in real time as the work was being performed.  I was able to give the client recommendations in real time.

Moistened towel protect surface roots

He was concerned about root damage, and rightly so.  Some of large buttress roots would be impacted by the paving.  Instead of cutting, I recommended covering the roots with wet towels, fabric etc, then placing moistened sand base, then pave over the roots.

Moistened sand placed over protected roots

As terrible as it is, the corona virus has created many new ways for industries to re-invent how they do their business.  This was the first time I have attempted on online site inspection and it worked!  This may not be applicable for the types of investigations I perform, but there is a great new tool I can use for certain types of investigations during stay at home and even beyond.

Asphalt paving over protected roots

 

The financial savings for the client are obvious.  Travel costs for me to travel to Los Angeles, Orange or Inland Empire typically range from $500 to $1000 or more if hotel stay is required.

Not all inspections can be performed remotely.  Forensic investigations that require measurements, excavations, sampling, testing etc may not be applicable.

Since this is new to me, it will take some real time client cases for me to determine how and when I can utilize this new tool.